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Southern marsh orchid

Events and Activities on January, 2018

Ash Coppicing

Date of Event: 23 January 2018

Event Category: Workshop

Join the Medway Valley Countryside Partnership and spend a day coppicing an ash tree at a local wildlife site.


Coppicing is a traditional woodland management method that has been used across the country for centuries. Learn about this traditional technique and about the way that coppicing a tree can stimulate new growth and allow certain species to live for a very long time. We will also learn about the way that coppicing a wood can promote biodiversity and encourage resilient woodlands.
Definition:
coppice
noun
 1.an area of woodland in which the trees or shrubs are periodically cut back to ground level to stimulate growth and provide firewood or timber
verb
 1. to cut back (a tree or shrub) to ground level periodically to stimulate growth.

Lead by experienced staff at the Medway Valley Countryside Partnership

The workshop is suitable for adults and families  Children are welcome but the event will involve extensive use of bladed tools and so close supervision is necessary. We will have some activities suitable for children aged 7 and up.

Ash Workshops

Join the mailing list or connect with us on social media and we’ll let you know when new workshops and walks are announced.

This workshop delivered in partnership with the Medway Valley Countryside Partnership

“Fraxinus” A celebration of fire

Date of Event: 20 January 2018

Event Category: Workshop

A winter-time celebration of the meaning of Ash’s latin name, which means “firelight”. Ash was traditionally used as a yule log (sometimes in the form of a faggot bundle) and burns brightly, for a long time – green or seasoned. We will use ash that has been coppiced to teach wild fire lighting and fire building skills, and use it to warm spiced apple drinks.

The Firewood Poem

Beechwood fires are bright and clear
If the logs are kept a year,
Chestnut’s only good they say,
If for logs ’tis laid away.
Make a fire of Elder tree,
Death within your house will be;
But ash new or ash old,
Is fit for a queen with crown of goldBirch and fir logs burn too fast
Blaze up bright and do not last,
it is by the Irish said
Hawthorn bakes the sweetest bread.
Elm wood burns like churchyard mould,
E’en the very flames are cold
But ash green or ash brown
Is fit for a queen with golden crownPoplar gives a bitter smoke,
Fills your eyes and makes you choke,
Apple wood will scent your room
Pear wood smells like flowers in bloom
Oaken logs, if dry and old
keep away the winter’s cold
But ash wet or ash dry
a king shall warm his slippers by.

The firewood poem was written by Celia Congreve, is believed to be first published in THE TIMES newspaper on March 2nd 1930. © by owner. provided at no charge for educational purposes

Ash Workshops

Join the mailing list or connect with us on social media and we’ll let you know when new workshops and walks are announced.

This workshop delivered in partnership with the North West Kent Countryside Partnership

The Ash Archive

Date of Event: 18 January 2018

Event Category: Exhibitions

The Ash Archive is an exhibition that celebrates our human relationship with ash trees and the woodland environment. The artworks in the exhibition reflect on transition, the uses of the wood and our dynamic and complex relationship with the life, death and materials of the natural world.  The artworks are accompanied by a growing collection of objects made of ash that aims to chart the innovation and wide variety of  uses of this beautiful wood. With commissions and existing works by artists and designers,  including  Ackroyd and Harvey, Colin Booth, Adam Chodzko, Sebastian Cox, French and Mottershead, Magz Hall, Max Lamb, Sheaf and Barley and David Nash (in collaboration with Common Ground) and a collection of objects made of ash wood for Rob Penn’s book “The man who made things out of trees”.

The Ash Archive is a collaboration between the University of Kent and The Ash Project. The Ash Project is an urgent cultural response to this devastating loss of one of our most important species of tree. The exhibition curated by Madeleine Hodge and Rose Thompson for The Ash Project in partnership with the University of Kent.

The exhibition will tour galleries across Kent in 2018 to Limbo Gallery in Margate, Nucleus Arts in Chatham, UCA Brewery Tap in Folkestone as part of the Salt Festival and at Kaleidoscope Gallery in Sevenoaks.

From Saw to Spoon

Date of Event: 9 January 2018

Event Category: Workshop

Join The Ash Project and the Kent High Weald Partnership at Local Nature Reserve, Cinderhill Woods in Kent for a day of green woodworking.

Join The Ash Project and the Kent High Weald Partnership at Local Nature Reserve, Cinderhill Woods in Kent for a day of green woodworking to help celebrate the ash tree and create a lasting record of this iconic British tree.

Using only traditional hand tools and equipment we will coppice an ash tree and then process it into a variety of different traditional items including: spoons, tool handles and stools. We will explore the many traditional uses of ash and learn some skills to make things as we go. We will fell, cleave, split, whittle, shape, shave, bore, batten, point, gouge and bodge.  As well as providing all the tools and equipment we will have a hot fire and tea and biscuits.

The whole process from felling to finished article will be filmed and photographed for The Ash Project online archive.

This is a free public event, but places are limited so booking is highly recommended. The workshop is suitable for adults and families  Children are welcome but the event will involve extensive use of bladed tools and so close supervision is necessary. We will have some activities suitable for children aged 7 and up.

Ash Workshops

Join the mailing list or connect with us on social media and we’ll let you know when new workshops and walks are announced.

This workshop delivered in partnership with the Kent High Weald Partnership.